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20100101
20100131
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bork for the supreme court of the united states, and september 17 when i traveled to philadelphia with the president, it was a thursday and i missed my opportunity to question judge bork. and i got that opportunity on saturday morning, and i was the only one there and had -- at least there were only a few people there and had an opportunity to question judge bork for an hour and a half. and ultimately, played a key role in the rejection of the nomination of judge bork who believed in original intent and had a very, very different view of the constitution. did not believe in due process of law. that was not part of the constitution, and he disagreed with the incorporation of the ten amendments through the due process clause to apply to the states. and that was a momentous supreme court hearing. during the years of president george h.w. bush, there were many matters of note. one that stands out was the confirmation proceeding as to justice souter, and when justice souter was up for confirmation and i participated in that as a member of the judiciary committee as i have participated
the order for the process of tps status for haitians already in the united states. this is an intermediate immigration status that allows those who are here to remain and to work. as they work, many send remittances back home. this in and of itself is a form of support to haiti and a form of economic assistance to haiti. to qualify, you must have been in the united states before january 12, the day of the earthquake. if you qualify, you should go to uscis.gov, and there is information there to provide you on how you get the tps status. it will be good for 18 months from the date of issuance, so that will be in july of 2011. for haitians in the country who were here before the earthquake, we are now opening up the process of tps for you. lastly, if any haitians are watching, there may be an impulse to leave the island to come here. you will not qualify for tps status. if you do, you will be repatriated back if you attempt. this is a very dangerous crossing. lives are lost every time people try to make this crossing. please do not have us subvert are necessary rescue and relief efforts going
-speed internet in the united states. our guest is larry cohen, president of the communication workers of america appeared this was taped in december 2009. >> host: in this week on "the communicators," larry cohen who is the president of the communication workers of america, also here to join in the question, lynn stand-in patella wit "communications reports." >> guest: most of whom work in the communications field. could be broadcasting, could be journalism, could be the largest group works on some networks. we also have several hundred thousand retired members who remain active in many ways. so we are in every state. we are 10,000 counting including the cato burke institute. active members. >> host: what sort of organizations or companies do they work for -- to the members work for? >> guest: about a thousand different countries like at&t and general a wreck and verizon, comcast, "the new york times" and many of the newspapers of the news agencies. post goes to when it comes to policy matters, mr. cohen, what are some of the major areas of concern that you concentrate on with cwa. >> host: the
in establishing high-speed internet in the united states. our guest is larry cohen, president of the communication cans workers of america. this program was taped in december 2009. >> host: and this week on "the communicators" larry cohen who is the president of the communication workers of america. also here to join in the questioning, lynn stanton, senior editor with telecommunications reports. mr. cohen, if you could very briefly, give us a snapshot of the communication workers of america. >> guest: cwia, as we call it, is 700,000 women and men most of whom work in the communications field, could be broadcasting, could be journalism, could be the largest group works on networks. and we also have several hundred thousand retired members who remain active in many ways. so we're in every state, we're 10,000 in canada including the canadian broadcasting company. active members. interested in their world. >> host: what sort of organizations or what companies do they work for, do your members work for? >> about a thousand different companies, largest are companies like at&t and general electric and v
smith served in the united states senate from 1996-2008, and he was on the commerce committee during that time which is very much involved in telecommunications policy. our guest reporter this week, john eggerton who is the washington bureau chief of broadcasting and cable magazine. thanks to both of you for being here. >> guest: thank you. >> host: senator, i want to start not so much with telecommunications, but with the supreme court decision this week, and i'm going to ask can you what their ruling on campaign finance means for your members. >> guest: well, i probably should admit i never voted for mccain-feingold, so i actually think it's a good decision for freedom of speech. but ultimately you can't get on tv or radio without paying for it. broadcasters have lots of costs and production of content and, you know can, the american people rely on their tv and radios. ultimately, i suspect it means there'll be more political advertising, but i think that the best part of the ruling was full disclosure, and i think the more that's disclosed, the american people can make a judgment
. so we're very international though we're headquartered in the united states. >> host: how is it funded? >> guest: we're funded by fees on the registration of domain names. so when a registry such as a dot.com or a dot.edu, they pay us around 20 cents per year, and we also get an entity like go daddy or register come, when you go and register that domain name, about another 18 cents or so goes to ican. so that's how we get our fund, off the registration of domain names. there's some other minor sources. >> host: so no government funding at this point. >> guest: zero government funding. >> host: and is there government oversight? >> guest: well, there was some government oversight in a form until october the 1st from the u.s. government where we published reviews to the u.s. government on a periodic basis. and that was done to make sure that we lived up to a standard of becoming this multistakeholder group because when we were formed around 11 years ago, peter, there was only one commercial registry then and one registrar. we were supposed to create this ecosystem of competi
although we are headquartered in the united states. >> host: how is it funded? as go where funded by fees on the registration of domain names. so, when a registry such as a.com or.org or.net or .edu registers a name come and typically that registry pays around 20 cents per name per year and then we also got a small fee per name from the registrar, an entity like go daddy at consumers think about a register.com. when you go register that domain name about another 18 cents or so goes to icann. so that's how we get our funding is not the registration of domain names primarily. or some other minor sources. >> host: said no government funding at this point? >> guest: zero government funding. >> host: is their government oversight? a >> guest: well, there was some in a form until october 1 from the u.s. government where we published reviews to the u.s. government on a periodic resave and that was done to make sure that we lived up to a standard of becoming this multi-stakeholder group because we were performed only 11 years ago, peter, there was only one real commercial registry van and one reg
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7